256 Million Colours of Violence

256 Million Colours of Violence

256 Million Colours of Violence is an interactive and participatory survey-based artistic project (www.256millioncoloursofviolence.com) that challenges political-religious-socio-economic quadrangle to create new visual vocabulary where participants become co-archivists. Through 77 questions on gender, race, ethnicity, privilege, social class, minimum wage, & other pressing issues, participants seek & share subliminal associations of ‘Colours of Violence’.

256 Million Colours of Violence

Third Space, Helsinki

The first iteration of 256 Million Colours of Violence is exhibited in Third Space, Helsinki, 2016. Through this exhibition, a first public encounter with this format of online survey takes place.

You can know more about the survey and participate at www.256milioncoloursofviolence.com

256 Million Colours of Violence

Artist Statement by Ali Akbar Mehta

256 Million Colours of Violence is a survey based interactive archival research project that asks the participants to choose a colour that to them represents violence. The project started as a response to the specific events unfolding after the Malegaon Blasts [1] (2006, India). Now, a decade after the event, this response has grown to encompass several other events in a world that is radically changing.

An inquiry into colour can lead to multiple directions. Colour is troubled light – a violently oscillating frequency entering our optical system that is translated by the visual cortex of our brain. When Newton split light into the visible colour spectrum it was science.Colours have become symbolic of emotions and thoughts, taking on animate qualities and connotations that surpass their scientific properties. Colour is a central feature of social life yet its value in sociological theory is ambiguous. Colour in its perception is familiar and intuitive and subjective in its meaning where we seldom understand it beyond the parameters of our own consentual social reality.

The relationship between colour and perception is fundamental, and this project is an attempt to dismantle our selves through our understanding of colour. Perception is informed by Context. The human eye is capable of distinguishing millions of colours, but total objective colour acuity is a skill more rarified than perfect pitch (the ability to identify a single musical note without accompaniment). Most of us need context in order to make accurate colour recognition but when coupled with the proper context, we notice very subtle differences in hue, lightness, and intensity.

Colour and its perception are an unstable and contestable phenomenon shaped by personal memory and social and material factors. Similarly, Violence and its perception are an unstable and contestable phenomenon shaped by social and material factors. When colour is coupled with a subject as topical as violence, we probably have a deeply personal and unique emotional response to it. Most of us, having a sufficiently distinct understanding of things could probably assign a colour value in terms of a quick interface of the emotional quotient associated with it. This often cannot be verbalised but may be linked to a sensory memory or association – this kind of attribution is done not as an intuitive understanding but rather as a Pavlovian learning [2] or an acquired understanding. Despite having no inherited political value, colour can be made political through a sequence of contextual references. Colour can become a complex dataset presenting a person’s nuanced understanding of the world. The format of the survey is intended to gather this understanding.

Most Data mining exercises and empirical scientific surveys require a culled group in order to eradicate diversity, a standardisation of the test group to remove ‘noise’. ‘256 Million Colours of Violence’ is a celebration of that noise which represents the diversity of Human experience and collective memetic history. It is also part of an ongoing discourse to reduce effects of stereo-typification through personal scrutiny of the word and meanings of ‘Violence’ by asking how is the narrative experience of colour embodied, embedded and extended in the contexts of these meanings.

The aim of the Project is also to make the participant aware, or conscious of his/her decision regarding their choice by embedding it within series of contexts. Choice here is an active participation as well as a subliminal interfacing of several seemingly disconnected values.

Political parties and media are comfortable with the political position of attributing ‘no colour’ on religious, community or ideology based acts of violence so as to avoid issues of colour associations and its apparent, actual or perceived impacts on society. The inherent logic of the project takes their view and reverses it by stating that “Violence has a colour – it is a value of an acquired understanding unique to each individual.” The project is an artist experiment based on no previous survey or standardisation. The choice of the participants are purely their own, which is to say formed by unique combination of various elements such as parenting, religion, gender, social circles, peer group and education to name a few.

The project is addressing the notion of freely given information, conditional agreements and consent – to corporations and governments, as opposed to an artist project; that an artist may be require to profile its participants in itself seems like a joke. The survey hints at issues pertaining to equality of gender, skin colour, race and ethnicity; questions privilege, social class and problems of minimum income as well as confronts through inquiry the political-religious-socio-economic quadrangle as a constant existence in our lives today. It also acts as an introductory archive of several streams of information, and as such occupies a paradoxical position making the viewer/participant both the giver and receiver of information, if they so wish.

To this end, the viewer/participant is confronted with a question:

What according to you is a colour of violence?

If I ask you this question, chances are that you already have a colour in mind. It’s probably a very strong colour, resonating with intensity of how important this question may be to you. You probably have a specific colour in mind, you just need to pinpoint it specifically to lock it down – to triangulate its position on the map of the colour chart, as it were.

This might be easy to do in a palette of 8, or 16, or even 64 shades. As a choice, it may even fit into a colour that may be generic template for the question – but what happens if you are confronted with a digital palette of 256 million colours? [3] Is your particular tint/shade/hue the exact same tint/shade/hue as the one you had in your mind – is your black / saffron / green / white / red the same as another’s?

______

[1] The Indian Connection – The Malegaon Bomb Blasts, 2006 and ‘Saffron Terror’:

Saffron terror is a neologism used to describe acts of violence motivated by Hindu nationalism. The acts are allegedly perpetrated by members, or alleged members of Hindu nationalist Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) and Abhinav Bharat. However, in some cases the motivation for the acts has not been clearly determined, and in others it has been determined to be unrelated to Hindu nationalism. The term comes from the symbolic use made of the saffron color by the Hindu nationalist organisations.

The first known use of the term ‘Saffron Terror’ is from a 2002 article in Frontline. However it was in the aftermath of the 29 September 2008 bomb blast in the predominantly Muslim town of Malegaon in Maharashtra that it came to be used widely. In late 2008, Indian police arrested members of a Hindu terrorist cell allegedly involved in Malegaon blast. The blame for several of these attacks had been placed on radical Islamist groups.

Former Home Minister of India P. Chidambaram urged Indians to beware of “Saffron terror” in August 2010 at a meeting of state police chiefs in New Delhi.

Since that remark was made, a Hindu Swami in the Patan district has filed a defamation lawsuit against Chidambaram, saying that the saffron color is symbol of Hindu religion and that saints across the country wear attire of the same color. The Swami also said that saffron was a symbol of peace, sacrifice and God, and that Chidambaram has hurt the sentiments of Hindus by linking the symbol with terrorism. On 6 September 2010, a Gujarat court ordered a probe into the use of the term by Chidambaram. Chidambaram was also criticised by members of his own party (the Indian National Congress) for the use of the term.

“Saffron or bhagwa or kesariya (Hindi equivalents of saffron) is not the issue here. The issue is terrorism. Terrorism does not have any colour other than black,” said Janardan Dwivedi, Congress general secretary and head of the party’s media department.

Making plain the party’s disapproval of Chidambaram’s controversial formulation, Dwivedi said terrorism could not be associated with any color, “be it saffron, green, white or red”. He further said, “Terrorism is terrorism and should be opposed in whatever form it comes.” Significantly, he also stressed that “saffron colour has been part of our ancient tradition and is associated with our freedom struggle”.

Home minister P Chidambaram did not exactly use the phrase ‘saffron terrorism’ but made it clear it was not his patent and in the past UPA and Congress leaders have found it quite expedient to refer to ‘saffronisation of education’ to target the previous NDA government.

While vowing that he would follow the ‘party line’ as supreme, the minister said there were right-wing extremist groups and the message that they could be capable of violence should not be lost in phrases. He said, “Perhaps the use of that phrase has brought home the message. So, the purpose, in a way, has been served.”

[2] A method to cause a reflex response or behaviour by training with repetitive action. The Russian physiologist Ivan Petrovich Pavlov conditioned dogs to respond in what proved to be a predictable manner.

[3] Photoshop has a digital palette of 256 Million Colours.

256 Million Colours of Violence

Third Space, Helsinki

The first iteration of 256 Million Colours of Violence is exhibited in Third Space, Helsinki, 2016. Through this exhibition, a first public encounter with this format of online survey takes place.

You can know more about the survey and participate at www.256milioncoloursofviolence.com

256 Million Colours of Violence

Artist Statement by Ali Akbar Mehta

256 Million Colours of Violence is a survey based interactive archival research project that asks the participants to choose a colour that to them represents violence. The project started as a response to the specific events unfolding after the Malegaon Blasts [1] (2006, India). Now, a decade after the event, this response has grown to encompass several other events in a world that is radically changing.

An inquiry into colour can lead to multiple directions. Colour is troubled light – a violently oscillating frequency entering our optical system that is translated by the visual cortex of our brain. When Newton split light into the visible colour spectrum it was science.Colours have become symbolic of emotions and thoughts, taking on animate qualities and connotations that surpass their scientific properties. Colour is a central feature of social life yet its value in sociological theory is ambiguous. Colour in its perception is familiar and intuitive and subjective in its meaning where we seldom understand it beyond the parameters of our own consentual social reality.

The relationship between colour and perception is fundamental, and this project is an attempt to dismantle our selves through our understanding of colour. Perception is informed by Context. The human eye is capable of distinguishing millions of colours, but total objective colour acuity is a skill more rarified than perfect pitch (the ability to identify a single musical note without accompaniment). Most of us need context in order to make accurate colour recognition but when coupled with the proper context, we notice very subtle differences in hue, lightness, and intensity.

Colour and its perception are an unstable and contestable phenomenon shaped by personal memory and social and material factors. Similarly, Violence and its perception are an unstable and contestable phenomenon shaped by social and material factors. When colour is coupled with a subject as topical as violence, we probably have a deeply personal and unique emotional response to it. Most of us, having a sufficiently distinct understanding of things could probably assign a colour value in terms of a quick interface of the emotional quotient associated with it. This often cannot be verbalised but may be linked to a sensory memory or association – this kind of attribution is done not as an intuitive understanding but rather as a Pavlovian learning [2] or an acquired understanding. Despite having no inherited political value, colour can be made political through a sequence of contextual references. Colour can become a complex dataset presenting a person’s nuanced understanding of the world. The format of the survey is intended to gather this understanding.

Most Data mining exercises and empirical scientific surveys require a culled group in order to eradicate diversity, a standardisation of the test group to remove ‘noise’. ‘256 Million Colours of Violence’ is a celebration of that noise which represents the diversity of Human experience and collective memetic history. It is also part of an ongoing discourse to reduce effects of stereo-typification through personal scrutiny of the word and meanings of ‘Violence’ by asking how is the narrative experience of colour embodied, embedded and extended in the contexts of these meanings.

The aim of the Project is also to make the participant aware, or conscious of his/her decision regarding their choice by embedding it within series of contexts. Choice here is an active participation as well as a subliminal interfacing of several seemingly disconnected values.

Political parties and media are comfortable with the political position of attributing ‘no colour’ on religious, community or ideology based acts of violence so as to avoid issues of colour associations and its apparent, actual or perceived impacts on society. The inherent logic of the project takes their view and reverses it by stating that “Violence has a colour – it is a value of an acquired understanding unique to each individual.” The project is an artist experiment based on no previous survey or standardisation. The choice of the participants are purely their own, which is to say formed by unique combination of various elements such as parenting, religion, gender, social circles, peer group and education to name a few.

The project is addressing the notion of freely given information, conditional agreements and consent – to corporations and governments, as opposed to an artist project; that an artist may be require to profile its participants in itself seems like a joke. The survey hints at issues pertaining to equality of gender, skin colour, race and ethnicity; questions privilege, social class and problems of minimum income as well as confronts through inquiry the political-religious-socio-economic quadrangle as a constant existence in our lives today. It also acts as an introductory archive of several streams of information, and as such occupies a paradoxical position making the viewer/participant both the giver and receiver of information, if they so wish.

To this end, the viewer/participant is confronted with a question:

What according to you is a colour of violence?

If I ask you this question, chances are that you already have a colour in mind. It’s probably a very strong colour, resonating with intensity of how important this question may be to you. You probably have a specific colour in mind, you just need to pinpoint it specifically to lock it down – to triangulate its position on the map of the colour chart, as it were.

This might be easy to do in a palette of 8, or 16, or even 64 shades. As a choice, it may even fit into a colour that may be generic template for the question – but what happens if you are confronted with a digital palette of 256 million colours? [3] Is your particular tint/shade/hue the exact same tint/shade/hue as the one you had in your mind – is your black / saffron / green / white / red the same as another’s?

______

[1] The Indian Connection – The Malegaon Bomb Blasts, 2006 and ‘Saffron Terror’:

Saffron terror is a neologism used to describe acts of violence motivated by Hindu nationalism. The acts are allegedly perpetrated by members, or alleged members of Hindu nationalist Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) and Abhinav Bharat. However, in some cases the motivation for the acts has not been clearly determined, and in others it has been determined to be unrelated to Hindu nationalism. The term comes from the symbolic use made of the saffron color by the Hindu nationalist organisations.

The first known use of the term ‘Saffron Terror’ is from a 2002 article in Frontline. However it was in the aftermath of the 29 September 2008 bomb blast in the predominantly Muslim town of Malegaon in Maharashtra that it came to be used widely. In late 2008, Indian police arrested members of a Hindu terrorist cell allegedly involved in Malegaon blast. The blame for several of these attacks had been placed on radical Islamist groups.

Former Home Minister of India P. Chidambaram urged Indians to beware of “Saffron terror” in August 2010 at a meeting of state police chiefs in New Delhi.

Since that remark was made, a Hindu Swami in the Patan district has filed a defamation lawsuit against Chidambaram, saying that the saffron color is symbol of Hindu religion and that saints across the country wear attire of the same color. The Swami also said that saffron was a symbol of peace, sacrifice and God, and that Chidambaram has hurt the sentiments of Hindus by linking the symbol with terrorism. On 6 September 2010, a Gujarat court ordered a probe into the use of the term by Chidambaram. Chidambaram was also criticised by members of his own party (the Indian National Congress) for the use of the term.

“Saffron or bhagwa or kesariya (Hindi equivalents of saffron) is not the issue here. The issue is terrorism. Terrorism does not have any colour other than black,” said Janardan Dwivedi, Congress general secretary and head of the party’s media department.

Making plain the party’s disapproval of Chidambaram’s controversial formulation, Dwivedi said terrorism could not be associated with any color, “be it saffron, green, white or red”. He further said, “Terrorism is terrorism and should be opposed in whatever form it comes.” Significantly, he also stressed that “saffron colour has been part of our ancient tradition and is associated with our freedom struggle”.

Home minister P Chidambaram did not exactly use the phrase ‘saffron terrorism’ but made it clear it was not his patent and in the past UPA and Congress leaders have found it quite expedient to refer to ‘saffronisation of education’ to target the previous NDA government.

While vowing that he would follow the ‘party line’ as supreme, the minister said there were right-wing extremist groups and the message that they could be capable of violence should not be lost in phrases. He said, “Perhaps the use of that phrase has brought home the message. So, the purpose, in a way, has been served.”

[2] A method to cause a reflex response or behaviour by training with repetitive action. The Russian physiologist Ivan Petrovich Pavlov conditioned dogs to respond in what proved to be a predictable manner.

[3] Photoshop has a digital palette of 256 Million Colours.

Limitations of Liability

Limitations of Liability was an eight day program between March 17 to 28, 2017, structured around ‘256 Million Colours of Violence’ – an interactive survey-based-research project by contemporary transmedia artist, Ali Akbar Mehta. This interactive survey-based-research project started in 2016, now includes more than 200 entries of people from all walks of life. 256 Million Colours of Violence is available to the public for free. The exposition of the past survey results will be installed along with a participation booth at The Mumbai Assembly and Harkat studios inviting everyone to participate in the ongoing survey.

Held across three venues – The Mumbai Assembly (Bandra), The Piramal Art Foundation (Lower Parel) and Harkat Studios (Versova) – the program also included poetry recitations, talks and discussions, and a series of films screenings concerned with the subject of violence and trauma.

Details below:

THE MUMBAI ASSEMBLY

March 17 – 19, 2017

March 17, 2017

256 Million Colours of Violence: Project Preview

6:00 – 9:00 pm

Performance by Ramneek Singh

Following a spoken word performance by Ramneek Singh, a conversation between Artist Ali Akbar Mehta and Ramneek Singh looks at ‘Colour and Violence’ through the lens of poetry and the spoken word, attempting to bridge the often unverbalised but deeply personal and unique emotional responses.

6:30 – 7:30 pm

March 18, 2017

Manifestation of Violence

Ali Akbar Mehta and Simpreet Singh discuss how the project is addressing the notion of freely given information, conditional agreements and consent – to corporations and governments, as opposed to an artist project. Simpreet Singh brings his knowledge and experience of having worked with the ‘Right to Information Act; (RTI) to similarly pursue and make visible those truths that are important to us.

6:30 to 8:00 pm

March 19, 2017

Big Data Ethics

Ali Akbar Mehta in conversation with Sameer Pitalwala discuss how most data-mining exercises and empirical scientific surveys require a culled group in order to eradicate diversity, a standardisation of the test group to remove ‘noise’. Instead, a project such as ‘256 Million Colours of Violence’ is a celebration of that noise which represents the diversity of Human experience and collective memetic history. It is also part of an ongoing discourse to reduce effects of stereo-typification through personal scrutiny of the word and meanings of ‘Violence’ by asking how is the narrative experience of colour embodied, embedded and extended in the contexts of these meanings.

6:30 to 8:00 pm

PIRAMAL ART FOUNDATION

March 24, 2017

The Urgency of Asking Questions: Ali Akbar Mehta in conversation with Kevin Lobo

7:00 – 8:30pm

HARKAT STUDIO

March 25 – 28, 2017

March 25, 2017

256 Million Colours of Violence

Project Preview

6:00 – 9:00 pm

March 26, 2017

Films Screenings*

10:00 am onwards

Exhibition and survey continues

10 am – 9 pm

March 27-28, 2017

Exhibition and survey continues

10 am – 9 pm

* Screening Schedule:

  1. 4.1 Miles (2016), 22min Directed by Daphne Matziaraki 10 am
  2. Nowhere Line Voices from Manus Island (2015), 16min Directed by Lukas Schrank 11 am
  3. Al midan [The Square] (2014), 1h 35min Directed by Mostafa Sharaf 11:30 am
  4. The Pride of Strathmoor (2014), 9 mins Directed by Einar Baldvin 1:30 pm
  5. Devil (2012), 8 min Directed by Jean-Gabriel Périot 1:45 pm
  6. How to start a revolution (2011), 1h 25min Directed by Ruaridh Arrow 2:15 pm
  7. Waltz with Bashir (2008), 1h 30min Directed by Ari Folman 4:45 pm
  8. Akrosh (2003), 20 min Directed by Yusuf Mehta 6:30 pm
  9. Ram Ke Naam [In the Name of God] (1992), 1h 31min Directed by Anand Patwardhan 7:45 pm

Limitations of Liability, Mumbai Assembly

Exhibition and Artist Talks

The project is displayed in Mumbai for the first time, in 2017.

As a traveling project across venues, the project in its iteration at Mumbai Assembly is conceptualised to be a space for discourse and conversation. This translated as three events, each a dialogue with an invited speaker to collectively reflect on violence in its various forms by forming symbiotic relationships with each other’s praxes.

Installation detail, Mumbai Assembly, 2017 Installation view, Mumbai Assembly, 2017 Filling the form Filling the form Response Details

_

Performance and conversation with Ramneek Singh Performance and conversation with Ramneek Singh Performance and conversation with Ramneek Singh

Performance by Ramneek Singh

March 17, 2017 6:30 – 7:30 pm

Following a spoken word performance by Ramneek Singh, a conversation between Artist Ali Akbar Mehta and Ramneek Singh looks at ‘Colour and Violence’ through the lens of poetry and the spoken word, attempting to bridge the often unverbalised but deeply personal and unique emotional responses.

In conversation with Simpreet Singh In conversation with Simpreet Singh

Manifestation of Violence

March 18, 2017 6:30 to 8:00 pm

Ali Akbar Mehta and Simpreet Singh discuss how the project is addressing the notion of freely given information, conditional agreements and consent – to corporations and governments, as opposed to an artist project. Simpreet Singh brings his knowledge and experience of having worked with the ‘Right to Information Act; (RTI) to similarly pursue and make visible those truths that are important to us.

In conversation with Sameer Pitalwala

Big Data Ethics

March 19, 2017 6:30 to 8:00 pm

Ali Akbar Mehta in conversation with Sameer Pitalwala discuss how most data-mining exercises and empirical scientific surveys require a culled group in order to eradicate diversity, a standardisation of the test group to remove ‘noise’. Instead, a project such as ‘256 Million Colours of Violence’ is a celebration of that noise which represents the diversity of Human experience and collective memetic history. It is also part of an ongoing discourse to reduce effects of stereo-typification through personal scrutiny of the word and meanings of ‘Violence’ by asking how is the narrative experience of colour embodied, embedded and extended in the contexts of these meanings.

Limitations of Liability, Piramal Art Foundation

in conversation with Kevin Lobo, Piramal Museum, Mumbai

Ali Akbar Mehta talks to Kevin Lobo about his project ‘256 Million Colours of Violence’ and the urgency of asking questions. They discuss tools of inquiry used and attempt to dissect the various narratives presented through the survey. Inquiries into colour, violence and their perceptions can lead to multiple directions – the conversation looks at how the narrative experience of colour may be embodied, embedded and extended in the contexts of these meanings.

The conversation was conducted in Piramal Museum of Art, as part of Limitations of Liability, an eight day program between March 17 to 28, 2017, structured around ‘256 Million Colours of Violence’ – an interactive survey-based-research project, asking people ‘What according to you, is the Colour of Violence?’.

The project began in 2016, and now includes more than 200 entries of people from all walks of life. 256 Million Colours of Violence is available to the public for free. The exposition of survey results were installed along with a participation booth at The Mumbai Assembly and Harkat studios inviting everyone to participate in the ongoing survey.

Limitations of Liability (link to exhibition) was held across three venues:

The Mumbai Assembly (Bandra), The Piramal Art Foundation (Lower Parel) Harkat Studios (Versova)

You can know more about the survey and participate at www.256milioncoloursofviolence.com

Limitations of Liability, Harkat Studios

Exhibition and Film Screenings

Installation view, Limitations of Liability_Harkat Studios_2017 Installation view, Limitations of Liability_Harkat Studios_2017 Film Screenings, Limitations of Liability_Harkat Studios_2017 Film Screenings, Limitations of Liability_Harkat Studios_201 Film Screenings, Limitations of Liability_Harkat Studios_201 Film Screenings, Limitations of Liability_Harkat Studios_201 Limitations of Liability Poster Film Screening schedule, Harkat Studios, 2017

Cyborg Archives: 256 Million Colours of Violence, TIFA Working Studios, Pune

Cyborg Archives: 256 Million Colours of Violence is the second in a series of five performance and participatory installations, exhibited as part of the culmination of my residency at TIFA Working Studios

256 Million Colours of Violence is an ongoing project. To know more about this project, click here

Colours of Violence, AROOP III - Totems and Taboos

(ed.) Nancy Adajania, published by Raza Foundation, New Delhi, 2018

In Conversation with Ali Akbar Mehta

Interview by Arlene Tucker, Pixelache Festival 2019: Breaking the Fifth Wall

In April 2019, I was interviewed by Arlene Tucker, Pixelache member, towards my participation in Pixelache Festival 2019: Breaking the Fifth Wall

Read the complete interview here.

Pixelache Helsinki is a transdisciplinary platform for emerging art, design, research and activism. It is an association of artists, cultural producers, thinkers and activists involved in the creation of cutting-edge cultural activities.

Not your Regular Archive

Sakal Times, 2018

Read here

Does violence have a colour?

Mid-day, 2017

Read here

Shades of Violence

Hindustan Times, 2017

Read here

What is the colour of violence?

Hindustan Times, 2017

Read here

Grant Report

for 256 Million Colours of Violence, Aalto University Grant

Grant Report:

Requiring grant funding of €2500 for content development and upgrading the website of this project. A grant of amount €1000 was released.

The following were directives of the application for the Aalto Arts Grant:

  1. The ‘back-end development’ and ‘front-end design’ of the website will be done with the help of an advanced programmer and UX designer.
  2. to include this new ‘research data’, creating a data platform of alternate and in-depth education across over 1700 subjects.
  3. The upgraded website will be published online on November 25, 2017.
  4. Until then the website continues to be available in its current form for participation in the project.

As per these directives, the grant amount of € 1000/- has been treated as initial funding to resume ‘back-end development’ and ‘front-end design’ of the website.

Work done:

A new User Interface (UI) has been designed replacing the current linear system with an easier navigation:

Front-end Design:

  • only a single question will appear at a time.
  • all answer choices will be displayed as easy to navigate boards, rather than as a linear list. This is done for a cleaner and more intuitive control. All boards are displayed simultaneously to facilitate an easier process of selection.
  • ‘hovering over’ each option displays an interactive textbox with a detailed explanation. The explanations constitute ‘research data’ forming a secondary archive.
  • A ‘progress bar’ indicates the current stage of the participant, and how many questions remain.
  • Questions have been grouped and clubbed into specific clusters. Completing each cluster allows the participant to save progress, and return to it later.
  • A new animated logo has been added to the home page.
  • A new Colour Gallery is incorporated into the website Home page, where the order changes based on selected parameters from the questionnaire. Each colour links to a summary of individual participant’s answers.

Back-end Development:

  • A new configuration of administrator control is added to facilitate incorporation of ‘research data’ into the interface of the website.
  • A data analysis engine will be will be incorporated into the website to analyse the incoming data through active participation into the third stage of the project.
  • In the current single page format of the survey, questions and their multiple choices are provided as a linear list, without detailed explanations making the website restrictive and difficult to navigate . It is not possible for any participant to know about each choice within each question thereby reducing the chances of informed decision. This redundancies affect the quality of the project.
  • This upgrade is a major step towards the process of completing this complex survey-based research project. It also facilitates the creation of easier processes in communication and design, allowing for more people to interact with the project, and for us as artist and developers, to continue to push the boundaries with the possibilities of what this hybrid artwork can do.

Future Steps:

  • Attending 1 month Artist Residency in Pune, India, titled ‘How to Participate in the Archive’, by TIFA Working Studios. During this residency I will complete the process of Archiving the ‘research data’ and incorporate it into the online project.

I would like to once again thank you for sharing the vision of the project and facilitating the means to make this work possible.